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Goldman Sachs “Dysfunctional Workplace”, Claims Ex-Employee, Sues Company: Report

Ian Dodd, who worked as a global head of recruiting at Goldman Sachs International from 2018 to 2021, argued in his suit that the company’s “dysfunctional” workplace led to his own mental breakdown.

A former Goldman Sachs employee has accused the investment bank of creating a “culture of bullying” where workers “sobbed through meetings” in a 1 million pound lawsuit filed in London. 

According to the Financial Times, Ian Dodd, who worked as a global head of recruiting at Goldman Sachs International from 2018 to 2021, argued in his suit that the company’s “dysfunctional” workplace led to his own mental breakdown. He claimed that the “excessive” work pressure caused him to fall ill one year after joining Goldman Sachs. As per the outlet, he also claimed that it was common to see employees at its London office “express distress” by crying and “sobbing through meetings”. 

Mr Dodd quit the investment bank in 2021. In his lawsuit, he accused the bank of overworking him and expecting employees to work long hours. According to the Fortune, the 55-year-old also claimed that it was common behaviour for staffers to talk about their colleagues receiving a “slap” or “punch” and said that he overheard comments such as “take that as your first punch in the face”. 

Goldman Sachs, however, has denied these allegations. “As with many workplaces, there were occasions when colleagues were upset, for a variety of reasons (sometimes unconnected with work and sometimes connected with work), but it is denied that such instances were frequent or usual,” the bank said in the filing, as per the Financial Times.

“It is denied that there was a ‘culture of divisiveness’ or unpleasant infighting at the Defendant, whether as alleged or at all,” the court documents added.

Further, the investment bank stated that Mr Dodd was incorrect in claiming that workers often “sobbed through meetings” or that there was a “consistently high level of emotion”. It said that Mr Dodd’s work pressure was self-inflicting and no one forced him to work overtime. 

“If Mr Dodd felt pressure, it was self-generated; it was not imposed on him. If he did work excessive hours, this was not because it was required or expected of him,” the bank said.

Now, as per Fortune, a case management hearing has been scheduled for December 2023.

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